Moms, Parents

#Parents: TV Is Not as Bad for Babies as We Once Thought

A study published in Child Development, conducted at Emory University and sponsored by The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (a division of the National Institute of Health), revealed that infants under 2 can learn signs from television time.

While the American Pediatric Association (APA) issued earlier statements advising parents against it, putting your baby down for a few minutes’ worth of an educational video is not so bad after all.

During the course of the three-week long investigation which took place through the Video Learning Lab at Emory University, parents introduced their 15-month-olds to ASL signs at home, either through videos or a picture book.

The best piece of information gleaned from this study is that when it came to video viewing, babies who watched with parents for approximately 15 to 20 minutes recalled a significant number of the 18 signs presented.

They performed just as well as those who learned from books. In addition, those that watched videos alone (without a parent next to them), also retained a significant portion of the information.

The findings suggest that television time for tots is not as harmful as we’ve been led to believe for years.

Once a week, the Emory team quantified their subjects’ learning outcomes by having them pair pictures with their matching signs. Parents also reported each week whether they observed their babies using these signs.

When the three-week period ended, researchers retested the children one week later to determine what they were able to remember. Recall was assessed specifically by having the infants produce signs when they saw pictures of the objects, and by asking them to point to the picture that matched the signs.

A leading author of the study, developmental psychologist Shoshana Dayanim, Ph.D., explained that the study was unique for a variety of reasons: It was a controlled one wherein the only way for subjects to learn signs was through this study during its allotted time periods. While previous research has been conducted with infants and language, — a murky area where it is difficult to control what is learned — the Emory exploration consisted of approximately 15- to 20-minute intervals of exposure.

The study uniquely presented the babies with expressions to actually employ and simultaneously understand.

Dayanim further explained that infants use signs interchangeably with verbal words and can sign words earlier than they can vocalize them. This not only helps communication in the present tense, but research supports that signing positively impacts vocabulary in early childhood.

Knowing that the American Pediatric Association once advocated for keeping infants away from television altogether, it is interesting to see there are benefits to TV learning — in a controlled environment.

Dr. Dayanim made it clear that Emory was not declaring“Watch TV!”, but that under the right circumstances, instructional learning can actually take place through instructional videos with children under 2.

The one drawback of the study was that researchers were not able to determine exactly when to draw the line on video watching.

Parents may want to play it safe by keeping educational viewing to a minimum as the researchers did.

If a parent needs 15 to 20 minutes to unwind, explained Dayanim, their baby can actually learn something in the process.

Just don’t bother with sight words at such an early stage. The research only attests to success with signs.

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Cults, Psychology

#NXIVM: A Focus (Again!) on the Children Who are Victims

In a prior post I wrote about NXIVM’s Rainbow Cultural Garden, a chain of nursery schools for kids of the cult members. I spoke about how the children are immersed in 7 different languages simultaneously which results in confusion, utter babble and delayed speech, as well as attachment issues (because children are separated from parents for lengthy periods.) NXIVM has shut down its professional development centers (where expensive classes are held), but the nursery centers are allegedly still operating.

Here is what one concerned citizen wrote to NXIVM whistleblower Frank Parlato of The Frank Report:

Ferdinand Rinder: A few points on Raniere

by Reporter

By Ferdinand Rinder 

Hi Frank;

First: I wanna thank you for your awesome hard work done so far. I like most your statement in the video interview with Vice News.

“He (Keith) went to win, I (Frank) went to win. He (kR) lost!”

Applause.

Good job well done. Including a big thanks to DOJ.

Second: The Rainbow Cultural Garden operations are mistreating innocent children and as far as we know still up and running –  around the world – with illegal nannies training kids with unproven and unlicensed teachings of KR.

These need to be shut down ASAP and hold the teachers accountable.

Third: The bookkeepers and funding sources of NXIVM, conducting tax fraud by instructing through KR, need to be locked up as well. There is/was a big cash flow by membership fees and there should be taxable income – which I am sure was not reported.

Fourth: The cauterizing doctor and the brain expert doctor – are they still practicing? When do their licenses get revoked? They are a risk to the public.

Now some observations;

Frank, with all due respect to your hard work – much of what you write is below your level – unless you need the clicks – by stressing over and over a sex story.   The judge has proven he is smart and looked through the bail game.

His statements, reported in all media, including your own clear summary, are loud and clear: We keep you [KR] here and roast you slowly. You can waste Clare’s money as long you like but you ain’t going nowhere.

Let it go for now:  You made a cool statement in your video interview which I liked most: “He went to win, I went to win, he lost.”

This statement was presented very cool and convincing and came across very strong.

I’d focus on new subjects with priority to rescue those kids in Rainbow and deprogramming Nxians who wanna leave. If you push them, they may support the gov. with a plea to speed up trial and make sure nothing will be missed.

KR and Allison Mack have sufficient charges in the pipeline, with smaller ones likely to be dropped in favor of bigger ones. It doesn’t matter if he gets three life sentences, he will be locked up for the rest of his life.  This was clear after the last hearing.

Let’s focus on tax fraud. This will be the rope hanging Nancy and the Bronfmans. Be patient, reverse bookkeeping and restatement of their tax returns for 90 companies, will take any accountant weeks or months but I suspect the gov., is working on it.

Finally, does the MDC, where Raniere is being held do STD testing at welcome inspection?  There is no way a person can live for decades in the style Raniere lived without getting something contagious and giving it too.

The parasite.

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Books

‘What’s the Big Deal About: Freedom?’ The Second Book of a Fun & Informative Kids’ Series

Several months ago, I reviewed my former classmate Ruby Shamir’s children’s book What’s the Big Deal About: First Ladies and interviewed her about her experience working with Hillary Clinton. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/whats-the-big-deal-about-first-ladies-an-interview_us_58607c5ce4b068764965bd46 As the first in the What’s the Big Deal series (the publisher is Philomel Books, an imprint of Penguin Young Readers Group), First Ladies serves as a teaching tool in schools and is also a book for kids to read at home. A bit longer than most children’s books, I found it easiest to break down into different sections and allot them to certain nights of the week for my rambunctious 7 year old twins. With the second in this installment, What’s the Big Deal About: Freedom, one of my twins and I were able to digest everything in a single sitting. It could be due to the passage of time and resulting maturity from one reading to the next, but Freedom is also a shorter read. My son was pretty psyched to share what he already knew about the founding fathers, the Declaration of Independence, The Constitution, voting rights, slavery and emancipation. He couldn’t wait to get to the part in the book about Martin Luther King while we were discussing events of the 1700s.

Having such an enthusiastic reader certainly helped, but What’s the Big Deal About Freedom definitely captures the attention of children and adults alike. I am ashamed to admit that I had never heard of the slave who hid in a box to escape from Virginia to Philadelphia where he could be free. My son, on the other hand, already knew all about this. Reading the book together gave him a chance to show me what he had learned and had really paid attention to in school (it’s possible I had learned all of these things as well, but I may not have paid as much attention or have forgotten a lot from my elementary school days). His twin would pop in and out of the room to state facts such as “the underground railroad wasn’t a real railroad” and give me further detail on how it operated – I laughed thinking about the “Real Housewife” on Bravo TV who thought there was an actual railroad with trains involved while my own grade schooler was easily breaking down the metaphor to me.

 

We also discussed terms like “Abolutionist,” “Emancipation” and “child labor laws.” We delved into the Emoluments Clause of the constitution and how America was once under British rule and citizens had to answer to a monarchy. In relation to today’s presidency, we discussed not only this theme but that of freedom of speech and freedom of the press. All of these themes are mentioned or touched on in the book. Ruby Shamir provides much food for thought for her readers that not only covers history but can be paralleled to current events.

 

My eager reader noted the irony of Thomas Jefferson keeping slaves though “he wrote the words that became the basis of every struggle for freedom in America” as it states in the book. I noted that Frederick Douglas’s story is given in an illustrated corner in this kids’ guide while our current president was recently not even sure if Douglas was alive or dead today. Hours after reading together, my “tester” impressed me with his recall of the timeline of historic events pertaining to U.S. freedoms.

 

What’s the Big Deal About Freedom is a great gift for children from parents, aunts, uncles, godparents and friends. It also makes a terrific end of year treat for any teacher preparing for next year’s students. The book, along with What’s the Big Deal about First Ladies can be purchased in stores or at www.penguinrandomhouse.com.

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